Last edited by Garr
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

3 edition of Effect of removing understory on growth of upland oak found in the catalog.

Effect of removing understory on growth of upland oak

Martin E. Dale

Effect of removing understory on growth of upland oak

by Martin E. Dale

  • 98 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station in Upper Darby, Pa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Forest thinning,
  • Oak -- Growth

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Martin E. Dale.
    SeriesResearch paper NE -- 321.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination10 p. :
    Number of Pages10
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17616004M
    OCLC/WorldCa1902507

    Oak (Quercus spp.) research and management often focus on northern red oak (Quercus rubra) and assume that associated upland oaks have similar growth patterns. To test this premise, we measured the survival and development of four species of acorn-origin oak seedlings growing in four different levels of understory sunlight for 8 by: 8. For understory growth, the probability of obtaining height growth thresholds for red oaks, white oaks, and non-oak species decreased with increasing overstory density. Height growth of red oaks, white oaks, and non-oaks were not statistically different when .

    White Oak. Fagaceae -- Beech family. Robert Rogers. White oak (Quercus alba) is an outstanding tree among all trees and is widespread across eastern North America. The most important lumber tree of the white oak group, growth is good on all but the driest shallow soils. Considerable evidence suggests reintroduction of fire can maintain upland oak ecosystems by removing competing species and increasing understory light. A number of studies are being conducted in collaboration with Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest, located in Clermont, KY, with the overarching objective of better understanding oak and.

    Quantification of the temporal and spatial variations of soil respiration is an essential step in modeling soil carbon (C) emission associated with the spatial distribution of plants. To examine the temporal and spatial variations of soil respiration and its driving factors, we investigated soil respiration, microclimate, and understory vegetation in a 50 m × 70 m plot in a climatic Cited by: 5. Action: Log/remove trees within forests: effects on understory plants Key messages Read our guidance on Key messages before continuing. Five of ten studies (including four replicated, randomized, controlled studies) in Bolivia, Canada, India and the USA found that logging trees in forests increased the density and cover of understory plants. Five studies found no effect or mixed effects.


Share this book
You might also like
Georges Store (Parents Magazine Read Aloud Library)

Georges Store (Parents Magazine Read Aloud Library)

Going to School

Going to School

Voluntary Action Manchester directory of voluntary & community groups.

Voluntary Action Manchester directory of voluntary & community groups.

Risk management

Risk management

Early and middle bronze age pottery of the Cesnola Collection in the Stanford University Museum

Early and middle bronze age pottery of the Cesnola Collection in the Stanford University Museum

Andy Dooey of Dunloy

Andy Dooey of Dunloy

Infrared spectroscopic studies of hematite

Infrared spectroscopic studies of hematite

Media pack, 2009

Media pack, 2009

Bottoms (Body in Art)

Bottoms (Body in Art)

Leopold Auer graded course of ensemble playing

Leopold Auer graded course of ensemble playing

New river

New river

Grieg, the writer.

Grieg, the writer.

Effect of removing understory on growth of upland oak by Martin E. Dale Download PDF EPUB FB2

The amount of additional growth attributed to complete eradication of all woody understory vegetation varied for several widely scattered upland oak stands in the region.

Based on paired-plot comparisons of 10 or more years' results, basal-area and cubic-volume growth usually increased slightly when the understory was eradicated. The amount of additional growth attributed to complete eradication of all woody understory vegetation varied for several widely scattered upland oak stands in the region.

Based on paired-plot comparisons of 10 or more years' results, basal-area and cubic-volume growth usually increased slightly when the understory was eradicated. The amount of increase was related to (1) geographical stand Cited by: 5. Effect of removing understory on growth of upland oak.

Upper Darby, Pa.: Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, (OCoLC) Effect of removing understory on growth of upland oak / By Martin E. Dale. Abstract. Cover graphy: p. Mode of access: Internet Topics: Oak, Forest thinning please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.

: Martin E. Dale. Thus, at this critical stage in oak development, the occurrence of a thick sassafras understory could have negative effects on growth of co-occurring oak, primarily via light occlusion. Despite temporarily increased light and decreased red maple survival after single and repeated fires, oak survival and growth generally remained similar to or lower than on unburned by:   Results of understory removal in an oak-dominated, mixed-species hardwood stand in central Massachusetts showed no growth increase compared to control plots, even over 13 growing seasons.

Most other southern New England studies found no response on a variety of glacial till soils with a wide range in soil-moisture-holding by:   Regenerating oaks (Quercus L.) on mesic and hydric sites has remained a problem largely because of inadequate density and poor distribution of large oak advance reproduction prior to harvesting.

We examined the effect of midstory and understory removal on the establishment and 3-year development of natural and artificial sources of pin oak (Q. palustris Muenchh.) advance Cited by: In deciduous forests of the eastern U.S., a prevailing explanation for this trend is fire suppression leading to high competitor abundance and low understory light.

In response, prescribed fire is increasingly used as a management tool to remedy these conditions and encourage future oak establishment and by: Prescribed burning, an important management tool, may have strong effects of dead woody material given fire’s capacity to create and consume dead woody material.

We determined effects of long-term understory prescribed burning on standing and down woody material in upland oak forests in south-central North America. Classifying Patterns of Understory Vegetation in Mixed-Oak Forests in Two Ecoregions of Pennsylvania • Melanie J.

Kaeser, Peter J. Gould, Marc E. McDill, Kim C. Steiner, and James C. Fin Undersiory plots in mixed-oak stands in the Ridge and Valley and Allegheny Plateau ecoregions of Pennsylvania were classified to summarize the range of.

Upland oaks have two fundamental requirements for successful regeneration and subsequent management, both in oak-dominated systems and in systems where oaks are important components of mixed hardwood forests.

These two requirements are: 1. the presence of competitive sources of oak regeneration 2. timely, sufficient release of these oak. Effect of initial seedling size, understory competition, hardwoods exhibits greater initial growth following canopy removal but greater shade.

Upland oak ecology symposium: history. EFFECT OF FOREST STRUCTURE ON THE UNDERSTORY LIGHT ENVIRONMENT AND GROWTH POTENTIAL OF OAK SEEDLINGS IN A CLOSED CANOPY RIPARIAN FOREST Bradford J. Ostrom A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate Faculty of Auburn University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Masters of Science Auburn, Alabama Decem kg/ha in the upland oak type.

Conversely, mast production was profuse (> kg/ha) in 7 of the 19 years in the upland oak type and 9 of 19 years in the pine-oak type.

In that myriad species consume acorns, this phenomenon of erratic acorn production helps insure regeneration of oak forests during years when the ample acorn supply surpassesCited by: 6. Abstract. There is interest in restoring shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) in pine–oak woodlands where it once was e of its shade intolerance and slow initial growth rate, shortleaf pine restoration has remained a challenge because competition from hardwoods exhibits greater initial growth following canopy removal but greater shade tolerance with canopy by:   We determined effects of long-term understory prescribed burning on standing and down woody material in upland oak forests in south-central North America.

We hypothesized that as frequency of fire increased in these stands the amount of deadwood would decrease and the fine woody material would decrease more rapidly than coarse woody material. This study tests the following hypotheses for upland oak forests in the Missouri Ozark Highlands: a) the abundance of regeneration of all species will decrease with increasing overstory density; and b) the height growth of understory trees will decrease with increasing overstory density.

re-initiation phase allows the growth of some understory herbs and shrubs, as well as regeneration of trees. Understory re-initiation occurs when the forest is mature, about years after stand initiation.

As the process of tree death and understory tree and herb re-initiation continues, the forest enters the old-growth phase. EFFECTS OF MIDSTORY REMOVAL ON BLACK OAK (QUERCUS VELUTINA) AND WHITE OAK (QUERCUS ALBA) REGENERATION The formation of dense understories in eastern forests has created low light environments that hinder the development of advance oak reproduction.

Studies have shown that a midstory removal can enhance these light conditions and promote theCited by: 2. Lhotka JM, Loewenstein EF () Effect of midstory removal on understory light availability and the 2-year response of under- planted cherrybark oak seedlings.

Periodic intense fire increased the density of oak stems on upland sites (DyksterhuisHarlan ), but also promoted understory vegetation similar to prairie (AxelrodAbrams ). Early travelers through the region cursed the burned-through vegetation as .and recover oak forest vegetation, achieving and interpreting effects may be problematic.

For example, in many cases midstory tree growth appears to have exceeded a size threshold of fire sensitivity, thereby reducing effectiveness of burning (Franklin et al.Abrams ).

Moreover, long-term fire suppression has severely reduced fire-main.The objective of this study is to examine the effect of periodic fire on species dynamics and regeneration by evaluating growth, survival and the competitive capacity of natural oak regeneration and planted oak under four overstory, and three understory treatments on sites receiving historic frequencies of periodic fire vs.

non-fire areas.